Pen and Lead At Gen Con Con 2019

Pen and Lead will be at Gen Con 2019 this year and Bob would love to say, “Hello” to anyone who will also be there!GCLogo

Bob is volunteering with Ares Games either doing events in the event hall or doing demos at the booth, #341.

AresLogo

If you are there, please send a message and let’s say, “Hello!”

via Gen Con LLC | Gen Con 2019

Advertisements

Review of Starlight Stage from Japanime Games

A Review of Starlight Stage by Japanime Games

A Review by Chris Page

[Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the publisher but I have received a promotional copy of the game for this review.]

Product Name: Starlight Stage
Publisher: Japanime Games
Mechanics: Card Game, Competitive, Set Collection
Cost: $24.99
Genre: Anime, Pop Culture, Music, Pop Idol
# of Players: 3-4
Time: 30-60 minutes
Ages: 10+
Designer: Hironatsu Yamada

Starlight Stage is a 3 to 4 player game (3-5 with the upcoming Shining Star expansion) for ages 10+ where you are recruiting idols for your talent agency. You win by having the most fame points at the end of the game. This is done by recruiting stronger idols to your agency and sending them out to do different types of work for you, called assignments, which range from a drama appearance (1 fame point) all the way to the Starlight Stage (the only nonidol 5 fame point card currently in the game).


The game is similar to a deck-building game where you draft cards to a pool with your resources in hand. However, instead of the cards going to your discard and then slowing filtering into your hand, only idols that you purchase go to the discard pile, the rest go face up in front of you, either granting you fame points in the case of the fame cards or granting you medallions, which they call achievements, in the case of some event cards. The currency, which they call talent, takes the form of musical notes (Music), hearts (Charm), and diamonds (Acting), while the achievements use the same symbols but look like they are on a coin.

There are three different pools of cards; Idols, Fame, and Events.

The idols are the cards that give you talents to use to buy and are the cards where you will spend both your talents and your medallions. You can only ever use 1 idol card at a time except to buy event cards where you can use multiple idol cards to buy a single card. Also, you can only ever buy a single card each time you take a turn.

To play, each player starts with 1 each of the 3 starting idols. On their turn, they must play an idol to do something if they have an idol in hand, otherwise, you are required to pass. There are 4 different assignments you can take each turn: Acquire an Event Card, Reinvent an Idol Card, Acquire a Fame Card, and lastly Take a Lesson. The first three actions are fairly simple to understand. The last action, while still simple, can change what you are able to do down the road. For the assignment Take a Lesson, you send an idol you have in hand to gain a token that is used just like a talent from an idol. The talent that you pick however does not have to be the same as the talent of the idol you used. This can allow you to play a starting idol which only has one talent on the card and then use your talent tokens to buy bigger cards that you normally wouldn’t be able to buy with a starting idol.

The group that I played the game with so I could write this review are anime fans so they really enjoyed the art on the cards. The game played simple enough that it would be easy to break out and teach a new player/players but still have enough strategy in how you play your cards and which actions you take that it wouldn’t be boring for returning players that have already played the game a couple of times. I look forward to seeing what the upcoming expansion will bring to the game besides the 5th player and hope that I can get the group to play this again soon.

Find the game at Japanime Games’ website here:

Starlight Stage

On Boardgame Geek here:

https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/247790/starlight-stage

Review of SAS Interactive’s Carthage

Carthage Review

Carthage by SAS Interactive

A Review by Bob Nolan

[Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the publisher but I have received a promotional copy of the game for this review.]

Product Name: Carthage

Publisher: SAS Interactive

Mechanics: Boardgame, Competitive, Deck Building, Miniatures

Cost: $49.99, Amazon

Genre: Historical, Roman

# of Players: 1-5

Time: 30-60 minutes

Ages: 13+

Designer: Luke Sienen

Can you survive the Carthage theater and gain enough glory and survive the day? Find out in Carthage the miniatures board game from SAS Interactive.

Introduction

Carthage, is, at its core, a deck-building game. The cards in your deck (and in hand) are action cards that allow your gladiator to move, attack, or gain favor to help defend against other actions on a hex-based map of a small arena. It’s a take-that game where players try to attack their opponent’s models while gathering glory to buy new cards. The winner is the player who has the last model standing.

Components and Artwork

The artwork in the game is very thematic. Player cards have unique artwork on them and evoke a feeling of being in a gladiatorial arena. The cards also fit the theme and although nice, don’t distract you from gameplay. The artwork on the board is nice, and the hexes and other bits are easily distinguishable. As a color-blind gamer, I did find the red line two hexes in from the outside edge of the arena hard to find, although, that small issue didn’t bother me in the gameplay at all.

 

The components are nice and have a good tactile feel. You have cards in hand, you can buy cards, the cubes are nice as ways to track armor and glory. I find all the components of good quality. Although subjective, I didn’t grab any of the pieces and think there were shortcuts made in production.

The miniatures are made of plastic and come with colored hex bases so you can distinguish which character is yours in the arena. Although they won’t be winning any awards, they are detailed and interesting enough that the casual gamer should be satisfied while a more discerning hobbyist might find interest in painting their models.

 

The tokens used are good, thick, cut and punch out without ripping or tearing. The game board itself is durable and will stand enough use and normal wear and tear.

Game Play

Each player controls a gladiator that must survive the arena in order to win. Gladiators have their own decks of unique cards which are used to perform actions. However, the decks for each gladiator are the same. I think the designer lost a chance of interest at the point by not making each deck unique to the specific gladiator. Although all the decks are the same, the deckbuilding mechanic helps alleviate this issue to a small degree. I think, though, that it was a lost chance at making the game more interesting. Although there was this lost chance, players can choose to play with the unique equipment rules, which are unique to each gladiator. This does help, but, although it adds some depth to the game, adds an aspect that isn’t needed if the gladiators had their own unique decks.

The gladiators have their player boards that show armor, which is essentially their health, and the amount of glory they earned and spent. In addition, the player board has a spot for your deck and discard pile. Each gladiator starts at 20 armor, and once they lose all 20 points of armor, they are eliminated.

There are three main phases in Carthage:

  1. A theater phase
  2. An action phase
  3. Favor phase

In the theater phase, the top card of the theater deck is flipped and sets the mood,

the scene, or theme for the current phase. Some examples of the events on the theater card include “Bellows for Blood” which immediately grants all players +2 glory, “The Will of Hannibal” which says that the players with the most armor lose 2 armor. All theater cards affect players in the arena and can cause some surprisingly interesting situations to occur- Especially, if, in the middle of a game, one player has a lot of armor and has to lose some armor, or, a card causes characters to gain extra movement. The theater deck (event deck) has become a standard part of a lot of modern games and provides appropriate tension during the game.

The action phase is where players draw five cards from their respective decks and plan

which cards to play. These cards are important as they tell you what your gladiator can do- from moving, attacking, or gaining glory, you have to decide which cards to play and when. The first player will play their first card and move their miniature, doing damage or moving hexes, then the next player can play their first card, activating their miniature, and so on, until every player has played one card and activated their miniature. Every player gets a chance to play all five of their cards.

Although every player will play their five cards, you will not be able to use each card. Sometimes, you’ll have fewer cards with movement so you’ll have to keep your gladiator in one place while your opponents move around the arena. Timing is important so you have to plan your card in reaction to what other players play. The cards are supposed to mimic the actions your gladiator performs in the arena, but, you can’t always anticipate or react to your opponent’s exact moves.

The action cards make the game very tactical and strategy is key- Learn to use the right action card at the right time to destroy your opponent’s armor for the win.

In addition to moving, attacking, and gaining armor, the action cards can also gain you Favor. In phase 3, the Favor phase, you use the favor you earned in the Action phase to buy new cards to your deck. This is an opportunity to make your deck special and unique. As stated before, all of the decks for each gladiator are the same, but, the deckbuilding and purchase of cards will make the game more interesting and challenging, not only for you but for your opponent.

Game Design

The design feels as if the deck-building part was tacked on to an arena combat game. With only a few rounds before one of the gladiators is killed, the players do not have much time to modify their deck.

The game does play smoothly and it appears care was taken to get the gameplay right, the phases and stages flowing, and a feeling for gladiator combat.

The deckbuilding does not get in the way of the gladiator combat.

Conclusion

I played the game several times and although I did feel the deckbuilding aspect was tacked on, I recommend the game for those who like the verses of gladiator combat. The miniatures look good on the board, and the players in my group enjoyed the aesthetic, the gameplay, and the design.

To find this game on Kickstarter, visit: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/sascreative/carthage-easy-to-learn-easy-to-die

To find this game on Board Game Geek, visit: https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/224403/carthage

Or, click your way to the Carthage homepage here: http://www.carthagegame.com/

Sword and Sorcery Ancient Chronicles Preview

The Sword and Sorcery Facebook group has published an image of some of the new miniatures found in the ancient Chronicles sword & sorcery expansion.

Ancient Chronicles resin miniatures

What do you think, are they cool enough?

Click the image to be taken to the Facebook group.

Kickstarter Top-Grossing Trending- July 23rd, 2019

tta

Tabletop Analytics Takes a look at the top-grossing Kickstarters in the gaming category each week. Currently, the top five are as follows:

  1. Trudvang Legends from Cool Mini or Not.  They have raised $743,420 of a 200,000 goal from 9,403 backers. Enter a rich fantasy world, based on Norse myths and sagas, where no gamemaster is needed to experience story-driven adventures!

trud

2. Middara: Unintentional Malum from Succubus Publishing. This project is looking for $40,000 and are currently at $2,504, 548 with 11,314 backers. An epic adventure for 1-4 players set in a unique alternate world fantasy setting.

mid

3. Game Toppers 2.0 from Game Toppers, LLC has raised $506,073 with 1,128 backers exceeding a $50,000 goal. Upgrading your gaming experience with Quality, Affordable, Portable Game Toppers with Thematic Game Mats & Accessories.gt

4. Etherfields from Awaken Realms. Awaken Realms is at it again with 2,318,480 GBP easily beating a goal of 40,000 GBP, with 24,800 backers. Join first Dream Crawler – fresh co-operative Board Game experience with unique art and mysterious story waiting to be discovered.

ef

5. Battletech: Clan Invasion, from Catalyst Games is the fifth top grossing project this week with $972,946 raised towards a $30,000 goal, and 4,718 people supporting the project. The Clan Invasion brought dozens of new ‘Mech designs to the Inner Sphere. Now, we’re bringing them to your tabletop as new miniatures!

bt

KickstarterLogo

MK Hobby Paint Rack Review

Today we introduce the first of our guest articles. Chris Bilewicz took time to review the MK hobby paint rack as he had a lot of Army Painter paints he needed to organize.

Note: This is not a paid review

MK Hobby Paint Rack by Chris Bilewicz

After recently purchasing the Ultimate paint set form Army Painter which included 124 paints, I wanted to arrange and store them neatly on my desk rather than just keeping them all in a box out of the way. My preference as a painter is to have all my paints visible and in front of me as I paint. I also try to lay out my paints in some sort of order where similar colours and tones go together. This allows me to not only pick my highlight colours for the stage I am painting quickly but it also saves me time not having to find a specific colour as I go. So with that in mind, I needed to get myself a paint rack!
MKPaint4

My first solution (as with any) was to check on the internet to see what is out there and at what price. Luckily without too much time and effort exerted I came across a company on eBay called MK Hobby. They are a Polish company and have a large selection of paint racks on offer to choose from. For my purchase, I went for the (HDF) Paint bottles rack organiser that holds 135 paints. Originally I wasn’t a 100% sure on this purchase as the height of the rack was 40cm and I thought this may be quite imposing on my desk, as I have previously used a low lying wide organiser for a different paint range.

MKPaint2
The product is made from laser-cut hardboard and the components which there are 26 of are around 4mm thick, needless to say, it is very sturdy! As it was laser cut, everything fit to perfection. I did use some glue whilst assembling it because I wanted the final product to be firm and hold all the paints with ease. I would recommend using some glue, as it was a little bit fiddly putting together some of the elements unless you have a helping hand from someone to hold parts whilst you are assembling. It took around 20 minutes to put together and the instructions were very useful and easy to follow which always helps!

Finally, the finish of the product is aesthetically pleasing to the eye and touch. The wood is very smooth and with no jagged edges what so ever. Even the MK logo at the bottom of the rack looks nice. You can store the dropper bottles both normally, or cap down – whichever your preference is. As another option, you could certainly also lay the rack on its back whilst painting and it still looks neat and tidy. The paints won’t fall out as they are in a diagonal position whilst being displayed on the rack.

Overall I could not be happier with this purchase and I do recommend it and the company highly. Not only has it sorted my storage solution for all of my paints but it does make my painting area look professional again.

You can find MK Hobby on Facebook and Ebay or email them. Links are below

https://www.facebook.com/mkhobby/

Email: mkhobby.poland AT gmail DOT com

ICv2: Tabletop Game Kickstarters Still Growing

ICv2 is reporting here ICv2: Tabletop Game Kickstarters Still Growing that more dollars were raised in the first half of 2019 than any previous year. Although, 2019 barely beats out 2018 so far.

KickstarterLogo

2018 was a year of records, so we will see how that goes for 2019, including most money raised, the number of funded projects and more $500,000 projects were funded.

At some point, the Tabletop industry has to reach market saturation. However, I feel the market still has a few years left before that time comes. What are your thoughts?

Mars Attack Review- By Drew Wood

I now have my shiny copy of “Mars Attacks – The Miniatures Game”- here are my initial Thoughts – the Plastic Material – not a fan, it holds the detail ‘OK’ – but not as good as Restic – I know some people have said its fine or it looks great etc – without being arrogant I have handled hundreds (perhaps thousands) of miniatures over the last four decades, and quality-wise these (though above “average” for the material they are made of) are not the best I’ve seen. Either that or perhaps my own personal standards are a lot higher than other reviewers – or maybe I can “quell” the geek in me long enough to look at things realistically LoL!

Colouring the Plastic the way they have kinda obscured the Detail to the naked eye – especially with the Red Miniatures, I know they are aiming to snag boardgamers as well with the product – but that particular shade of Red does the sculpts no favours at all.

The Martian Soldiers, however, Look Good in the Green Plastic – the detail is clearly present. But out of all the models, the Human Military look the best in the raw plastic – perhaps because of the beige colour? (Although it would have been hysterically funny for me to see them produced in the same colour plastic as the Green Army Men he, he, he . . . ).

The detail (and the VERY fine Mold Lines LoL) becomes clear when the models are Undercoated – but because the detail is very fine/shallow (especially on the Hero miniatures) I recommend a good quality Undercoat, and several fine coats when spraying.

The Card Components are nice, and I got the clear plastic stands with my set – other reviewers observations about the card standees not working with the card inserts (the bit you use to make them stand up) is correct, the die cutting of the components left the slots way too wide. The Tokens are nice and sturdy and should stand up to a good deal of use. The Card “Trackers” are clear and bright, and again quite sturdy.

People have complained the Cards themselves are thinner than Deadzone – I found them to be roughly the same thickness – plus the quality of Card used, and the quality of the printing itself is towards the high end of the Market – any concerns about wear through use are easily avoided by the use of Card Sleeves.

The play mats situation is a little “odd” – several reviewers have complained the Paper used on the play mat is flimsy – and I would agree about the one that came in the Box. The extra Loose Ones I got were much better quality, thicker paper – but (as is usual with these things) the folds are so precise and strong – even the thicker play mats are going to break apart with continued use. If I were a customer purchasing this game in a store – I would (personally) prefer to spend a little more for Card Sections that I could use for longer.

The Rulebooks are sumptuous, like reading a graphic novel – really REALLY high quality. But over three books for the Core Game and Two Expansions – not an indication of Points Costs – are we going to get them at some point? If we don’t they are severely limiting the long-term play life of the game – I know I get bored of playing set scenarios with set models quite quickly, as I generally write my own Campaigns etc – and I am sure I am not alone in that way of thinking – FORTUNATELY I have since found out that the Points system etc will be in the final Rules Booklet “The Battle Continues” which is not back from the Printers yet.

Lastly, the Terrain – what more can I say than WOW – awesome, builds like a dream etc, etc – only ONE Criticism (and it was the same with DeadZone) not enough Connectors LoL! You need way more corner connectors than they provide LoL (thankfully, I had plenty spare).

Final Thoughts – a Good Solid Set of Rules, Usable Components – what I would like to see in the future are “deluxe” versions of the Plastic Miniatures (like they did for Dungeon Saga – with the Resin editions of the Miniatures) for OCD Collectors and Hobbyists like me.

Game Play – 9/10 (No Points System in Place as of Yet)

Product Quality – 8/10 (The Material used on the Miniatures and the Paper Play Mat factored here)

Product Life – 7/10 (I can’t see casual players taking to this in a big way, future products might change this though)

Overall – 8/10

Ninja or Samurai? Find out in Daimyo’s Fall

Ninja or Samurai? Find out in Daimyo’s Fall

title_image

Daimyo’s Fall is a deck-crafting game where players take on the roles of heroes in a land of a fallen Daimyo, or ruler. 2 to 5 players, ages 14 and up, can play a game in 60 minutes. Of course, familiarity with the game will make the game play faster.  Daimyo’s Fall comes to Kickstarter on May 9th, 2017.

The cards in Daimyo’s Fall are full of colorful and beautiful illustrations. There are hero cards, reinforcement cards, treasure cards (and a special type of treasure card, called Regalia), and lastly, Mon cards, which represent currency in the game

Hero Cards

eumeko_hero

Hero cards have nine different pieces of information that is clearly identified. Although it may seem like a lot of information, you’ll learn them just after a few rounds of play. Heroes don’t cycle through your deck like a normal deck building game, another reason you will learn their abilities and rules quickly. In addition to the nice layout of information, you’ll notice that heroes have different frames. Ninja have purple frames and samurai have a red frame. Identifying the class enables players to see which treasure cards each hero may pick up and determines the reinforcement or treasure cards that a player can use.

Reinforcement Cards

aiko

There are 18 different reinforcement cards, with all but two having six copies. Reinforcements allow players to get bonuses, gain skills or get victory points. There are eight different points of information on a reinforcement card.

Reinforcements are purchased to add to your deck. One unique feature of Daimyo’s Fall is the resell action. Each reinforcement card has a purchase cost as well as a value when sold. Mitsuki Sanada, above, is purchased for 10 Mon, but can be sold back for 5 Mon.

Treasure Cards

Treasure cards have two copies each and fall into two decks based on the samurai or ninja. To draw a treasure card, you must fulfill the loot condition of the active hero. Treasure cards work like reinforcements, but typically have a more powerful skill or bonus that heroes can use. Treasure is important because they give players victory points, which in turn, allow players to win the game. As mentioned above, there are some special treasure cards called Regalia and are difficult to acquire. The cost to draw one is high. However, players can also trade in treasures to draw a Regalia card.

Mon Cards

mon

Mon cards allow players to purchase reinforcements or heroes. They generate 1 Mon when discarded to the discard pile. An interesting limit in the game is that you can’t have more Mon cards than what you start with.  As the game progresses, they aren’t as useful, so find a way to remove them if possible.

Setup

In Daimyo’s Fall, each player starts the game with the identical decks of cards. All the heroes are shuffled into a deck and one is randomly disbursed to each player.  You can purchase more heroes, but you cannot have more than three heroes.  As in normal deckbuilders, you shuffle your starting deck and place your hero card in front of you. It is never shuffled into your deck.

The Domain

The Domain is the play area of Daimyo’s Fall and represents the palace of the missing Daimyo, the treasure, and the lotus tree at the top of the castle. Remember, once all petals fall from the lotus tree, the power of the daimyo is lost. Essentially, the loss of petals in Daimyo’s Fall represents a limit to the length of the game. Treasure cards, when played, release petals from the tree, so pay attention to the loss of petals throughout the game. There can be 40 or 50 petal tokens depending on the number of players.

There will be six face-down decks in the domain. You have a shuffled ninja reinforcement deck with 4 face-up cards available for purchase as well as a shuffled samurai reinforcements deck with four face-up cards available to purchase.  In addition, you’ll have a face-down hero deck, a ninja treasure deck, a samurai treasure deck, and a regalia deck. Besides the four ninja and samurai cards available for purchase, one hero card is drawn and placed face-up. This hero card forces a loss of petals based on the petal loss number displayed.  The domain is now set-up ready for play.

leaflet_image

Game Play

The game is played in rounds and a round is considered complete once every player has taken a turn. The oldest player gets to go first. Players, on their turns, play their Mon, reinforcement or hero cards to gain abilities and effects, to buy cards, or loot treasures. A turn has four phases. The Starting Phase has six actions that must be taken in order.

  1. Put non-exhausted cards into the discard pile. Change active heroes
  2. Move cards from your hand to the discard pile.
  3. Draw until five cards are in hand.
  4. Choose one non-exhausted hero to the active hero for this round. Active heroes can do 3 things:
  • Use loot conditions
  • Determine the skills that reinforcements and treasures can be used.
  • Duel
  1. Recovery all exhausted reinforcement, treasure, or hero cards by turning them vertically.

When choosing reinforcement or treasure cards, remember, only samurai can use samurai based cards and the same is true for ninja based reinforcements and treasures. If you have an active samurai hero, be sure to build a deck with a lot of samurai reinforcement cards.

The second phase of a player’s turn is the Main Phase. Players can take as many of the following actions as they wish, in any order. In this phase, a player can:

  • Deploy reinforcements or treasure. Deploying means to play a card and gain the bonuses immediately.
  • Purchase reinforcements or heroes. To purchase, discard Mon cards and buy the cards that you wish to put into your deck discard pile to be shuffled and drawn later.
  • Sell one or more reinforcement cards from your hand to gain Mon. Money gained this way must be spent this turn and can’t be saved or banked. An important note for gameplay is that heroes can be sold, but you must always have one hero. Also, a player’s deck can’t have less than six cards, so you can’t sell cards if your deck will go below six cards.
  • Use a Heroes’ skill. Skills are usually activated by paying a cost. Inactive heroes can use skills, but exhausted heroes cannot.
  • Return or Discard a reinforcement card from your hand. Some cards have rules that give you bonuses when you discard or when you return a card to its specific deck in the domain similar to selling a card.
  • Spend trade points. Trade points are gained through reinforcements and are special currency. You can spend trade points gained from deploying cards at any time during the turn.
  • Loot- When the actions match the active hero’s loot condition, you may draw an appropriate treasure card. Remember, this is how you score victory points and acquire better skills.

rulebook2

The third phase is the End Phase of the player’s turn. Not much happens at this point, but there are some effects that may activate at this point.

The last phase is the End of the Round phase. This is sort of a clean-up phase and the top card of the hero deck is revealed and is now able to be purchased. Don’t forget to remove petal tokens when you do so!  Also, the first player must choose two reinforcement cards and discard them and reveal two new reinforcement cards.  The first player token passes to the player on the left.

The end of the game occurs when the last petal token is removed. At this point, players count their victory points from reinforcements, treasure and hero cards. Ties are broken by the person who has the most treasure cards.

Although the game follows the traditional deck building rules, there are some fun interactions. There are times you can trade out treasures by using loot points. By spending up to 3 loot points, you can have three different “trade’ effects, depending what you want to do. You can trade the same class of treasure for another, trade a class of treasure for a different class of treasure, or trade out treasure for a single Regalia card. Remember, Regalia are powerful treasures and it might be beneficial to trade those cards out.

The second interesting interaction is dueling. Active heroes can duel other heroes. The attack and defense value of the heroes are based on their purchase and sell costs, respectively. Simply compare the attack value (purchase) value against the defender’s sell value, and the higher number wins. However, you can boost your value by discarding cards in your hand. So, you may discard cards and use the purchase cost as a boost to your attack or defense. Doing so means you may not have many cards in hand, but it may guarantee a win. Heroes will have a duel condition if they win or they may gain other bonuses. A hero that loses a duel must be turned inactive.

At first, there may seem to be large amounts of information on some of the cards. However, you don’t need all the information at once and you’ll learn what the icons mean rather quickly.  The text on the cards are also color coded- for example, we mentioned the colors associated with the samurai and ninja earlier. Text that matches a specific class is also color-coded for easy identification. In addition, words in bold print call out loot conditions so you always have a clear understanding of what must be done to gain those treasure cards.

jade_treasure

The rulebook identifies some confusing interactions with cards and clarifies weird or strange situations. The examples are well thought out and identified in the rules. In addition, there is a summary of the gameplay, index of terms, a list of symbols and their meanings, and some clarifications.

If you like anime inspired games as well as deck building games, Daimyo’s Fall gives enough unique qualities that it’s a no brainer to back and support. Kickstarter is to help creators with new projects, and this is exactly that. A new project from Axis Mundo and their design team.

Will you choose samurai or ninja to claim the great daimyo’s treasure before the last petal on the lotus tree falls? Find out on May 9th on Kickstarter, play it on Tabletop Simulator through Steam, or download the print and play from the website.

Daimyo’s Fall- A deck building game

Designed by Enrica Fincati and Francesco Simioni

Published by Axis Mundo

2-5 players

60 minutes

Ages 14+

Find Daimyo’s Fall can be found in the following locations:

On the web: http://www.daimyosfall.com/site/index.php

On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/daimyosfall/

Boardgame Geek: https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/192891/daimyos-fall

DF mock up